You're in! See your latest actions or visit profile and dashboard
Account Information
Dashboard
March for Babies Dashboard

  • Preferences
  • Messages
  • Favorites

March of Dimes to Launch Prematurity Prevention Network

Virtual Network of Experts to Work Together To Prevent Preterm Birth

Washington, District of Columbia — Thursday, January 19, 2012

save print
e-mail

The March of Dimes,along with its partners, are giving experts in the field of preterm birth prevention an opportunity to learn from each other and to work together to bring the nation’s preterm birth rate under 10 percent and give more babies a healthy start.

U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin will be the keynote speaker for the Prematurity Prevention Symposium. The symposium will serve as a forum to share lessons learned from regional and statewide perinatal collaboratives, review prevention efforts used by hospitals and providers, and showcase community-based intervention programs. The symposium’s purpose is to launch the Prematurity Prevention Network- a virtual network made up of health care providers, insurers, policy makers, and business leaders - who will work together to achieve the March of Dimes goal of lowering the preterm birth rate to 9.6 percent of live births.

Those wishing to join the network can create an account at prematurityprevention.org.

“Our goal is ambitious yet achievable. This symposium and the network will create opportunities for experts in the field to share information about how they designed implemented and evaluated programs, policies and other activities to prevent preterm births. Expansion of successful programswill move us along the path toward success,” said Dr. Jennifer L. Howse, president of the March of Dimes. “When we succeed - and I know we will – it will mean that 115,000 fewer babies each year would suffer the serious health risks of an early birth.”

Preterm birth is a serious health problem that costs the United States more than $26 billion annually, according to a 2006 Institute of Medicine report. Although the US preterm birth has declined in recent years, more than a half million babies are born too soon each year. It is the leading cause of newborn death, and one million babies worldwide die each year as a result of their early birth. Babies who survive an early birth often face the risk of lifelong health challenges, such as breathing problems, cerebral palsy, learning disabilities and others.

Among the experts invited to speak are:

  • Roberto Romero, MD, chief of the Perinatology Research Branch, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health,
  • Jay D. Iams, MD, professor and endowed chair, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ohio State University College of Medicine, 
  • Ruth Ann Shepherd, MD, division director, Adult & Child Health Improvement,Kentucky Department for Public Health,
  • Steven L. Clark, MD medical director, Women’s and Children’s Clinical Services, Hospital Corporation of America,
  • Bryan T. Oshiro, MD, vice chairman and associate professor, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine,
  • Wanda D. Barfield, MD, MPH, director, Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,
  • Samuel R. Nussbaum, MD executive vice president, Clinical Health Policy and chief medical officer, WellPoint, Inc.
  • Patrick Conway, MD, MSc,chief medical officer, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services,
  • Alan E. Guttmacher, MD director, National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health.

A joint effort by the March of Dimes, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM), Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the symposium and network grew out of the 2009 March of Dimes Symposium on Quality Improvement to Prevent Prematurity.

About March of Dimes
The March of Dimes is the leading nonprofit organization for pregnancy and baby health. With chapters nationwide and its premier event, March for Babies®, the March of Dimes works to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality.

For the latest resources and health information, visit our websites marchofdimes.org and nacersano.org. To participate in our annual signature fundraising event, visit marchforbabies.org. If you have been affected by prematurity or birth defects, visit our shareyourstory.org community to find comfort and support. For detailed national, state and local perinatal statistics, visit persistats.org. You can also find us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.

Trending