Your baby is growing, your body is changing

Your body changes a lot during pregnancy! In this topic, find out how much weight you can expect to gain as your baby grows. And learn how hormones can cause changes in certain parts of your body, like your breasts, skin and hair.

Learn what you can do to manage common pregnancy discomforts, including morning sickness, backaches and swelling (especially in your feet!). And unless your provider tells you not to, it’s OK to have sex during pregnancy, even with your growing belly. 

Most common questions

How do you know you're pregnant?

Knowing the signs of pregnancy can help you tell if you’re pregnant. Here are some signs that you might be pregnant:

If you have any of these pregnancy signs and think you may be pregnant, go to your health care provider. The sooner you know you're pregnant, the sooner you can begin prenatal checkups and start taking good care of yourself and your growing baby.

Is my baby moving enough?

You'll start feeling your baby's kicks at around the 28th week of pregnancy. By this time, your baby's movements are usually well established and some health care providers recommend keeping track of these movements.

  • Track kick counts at about the same time each day when your baby is active.
  • Track kick counts shortly after you've eaten a meal (when your baby may be most active).
  • Sit or lay on your side, place your hands on your belly and monitor baby's movement.
  • Mark every movement down on a piece of paper. Don't count baby's hiccups.

Keep counting until you've felt 10 movements from baby. If baby doesn't move 10 times within 1 hour, try again later that day. Call your health provider if your baby's movement seems unusual or you've tried more than once that day and can't feel baby move 10 times or more during 1 hour.

When will I start feeling my baby move?

Popcorn popping. A little fish swimming. Bubbles. Butterflies. Tickles. These are common words used by women to describe their baby's first movements. Also known as "quickening," it's a reassuring sign that your baby is OK and growing. This milestone typically starts sometime between 18 to 25 weeks into pregnancy. For first-time moms, it may occur closer to 25 weeks, and for second- or third-time moms, it may happen much sooner.
At first it may be difficult to tell the difference between gas and your baby moving. You might not feel movement as early as you are expecting to feel it, but you'll notice a pattern soon. You'll start to learn when the baby is most active and what seems to get her moving.

©2013 March of Dimes Foundation. The March of Dimes is a non-profit organization recognized as tax-exempt under Internal Revenue Code section 501(c)(3).